Call to Artists-” The Give and Get Show”

As many or most of you must know, I am very involved with raising money and volunteering. I have worked in the past as a development officer for non-profits. This year I was elected to the Board of my Junior League (we are very diversified) I decided to host a fundraiser that would incorporate artists, the local community, the Jr. League and a local art gallery.

Here is the details of the event-

Nov 19-20 is the event.
Artists to submit up to 3 pieces of artwork – all must be 8×10 (no stretched canvas) we ask that works be on paper.
All Artists are asked to submit a bio and contact info with their artwork and a thank you note to the new owner.
Artists will receive recognition on the Junior League of Greater Ft. Lauderdale website and email blast (with a link to your site)
Proceeds for this fundraiser will go back into the community projects. The Junior League has only 1 part-time employee, so all funds to do not support the league, but the community that it serves.
The St. Lawrence Gallery will also be able to see new artists for their gallery.

The League has over 500 members who come out and support our events. We also attract the community as well and advertise all of our events in the local press.  To learn more about my league go to www.juniorleagueftl.org

For a call to artist application please click on the link here:

give and get call to artists

For those artists who are looking for exposure into the South Florida area, what better way then with this event.

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Last week rejection, is this weeks winner

I entered two of my encaustic monotypes into the “Construct” show at Artserve in Ft. Lauderdale.  My membership to Artserve will expire in Sept.  It was last year’s birthday present to myself.  I had been a bit disappointed by the “call to artists” that they had all year. I decided to be selective of how and where I place my work.  I attend many of the artshows at the local guilds, and even thought they have a theme, I never can see it in the art that is on display.  Maybe it is just me.

So I decide to submit my small prints (4″ x 4″) into the show. The theme “Construct” was asking for artwork that would be used for home decoration. Since my prints have that “look” of decorator art (again, what I think it should be) I decided to put in 2 pieces. One piece I had professionally framed. This piece was going to be my “showcase” piece, so that people can see how a tiny piece of work, when framed, can create a look. My second piece I framed myself in a small frame.

So I enter and a week later I attend the opening.  I go, the gallery is packed and do not see my work hanging, so I thought, “Oh great, rejected again” as I start to leave a fellow artist, Susan Clifton, says, hey AJ congratulations and I say for what, my art is not even hanging.  It was behind her work and she said in the program it stated I won best in show.  The reception started at 6, but I didn’t get there until 7 and all the programs had been distributed.

I was amazed.I met the Judge, an architect and painter from Germany who teaches at the university in Boca Raton. He wanted to know how I did it and loved the piece. Even the Board of Directors  came up to me and said, it was unanimous, when we had the final selection, we all said “that one” .

And what did I win, a full year’s membership to Artserve.   But what I really got out of it was confidence and validation.

The highs and lows of the art world.

a picture from my iphone of the winning piece

First time my art was rejected from a local show…

I was so excited to submit a piece of work in a show at a local gallery called “Summer Heat”. I just started this new process of melting the wax under a 600 watt lamp and working with the drips. I also thought how appropriate it was “melted” for a show titled “Summer Heat”.
I have not been successful with the local art guilds in South Florida and there are now many “vanity Galleries” that you pay for wall space. But I have faith that I will find my niche here in South Florida. Since I am not working full-time at the moment, I can work in the studio and start to connect with the galleries in Miami.
But I must admit I am upset. I have never had my work rejected, but then again, it may not fit in with the other work that was submitted.
I wonder if they will return my entry fee????

Attended the Gallery Walk in Wynwood

I finally attended the Gallery Walk in the Wynwood Arts District of Miami. First, I felt so old. This being Miami, I forgot that I most of the girls wear a shirt as a mini-dress, and all the art “kids” are 20 years old, in black skinny jeans and tee’s and all need a bath. I guess when I was that age, I looked the same. As a grown women, the parent instinct takes over.

The artwalk was unique. The crowd that attends the Miami Design District a few blocks north is usually more “latin” and older. This crowd was more american and very young.
My favorite galley is that of A. Dale Nally who lives and works in his studio. His living work space is beautiful. He was a pioneer 10 years ago when he opened in the area. My dream would be to live in a space like his, but I would not have room for the husband, the dogs and the cars, and the big screen tv. So I took pictures of his living space and will ask my husband if I can redecorate the living room. I will keep you posted if I get him to agree.

Artformz was the first gallery that I walked into and they had a performance artists in the front of a girl mixing cookie dough. I still never fully understand performance art. The gallery had an assortment of all small pieces, all at various prices.
I always wonder when, do they all sell the work? I am always thinking as a business person and trying to figure out the business model. The prices from one studio to the other are extreme, as well as the audience that they are seeking. I would imagine that the galleries make their income with private collectors.
But overall, it is nice to know that the art scene in Miami is growing and continuing to expand.

Santa Fe Day 2 and everyone seems to be reinventing themselves…

Just finished and I am exhausted. Learned how to dip papers in wax, fuse with a 600 watt light bulb (with protective eyewear) and worked on scrolls. I am on overload. But Paula always has fun workshops. Decided to purchase another Hotbox with a large plate. I like to work very small or very big.
It was interesting that 2 other “artists” are thinking about becoming full time artists. These 2 artists I met 3 years ago at Ghost Ranch in Abiqui. Now they, like myself are looking to retire from our full time jobs to pursue our art.
There must have been something in the water that day at the Ghost Ranch. We are 3 different age groups, even though I am on the verge of still being a baby boomer, yet we are all in the same place.
I posted all the photos of the workshop on my flicker page.

last piece and exhausted

What is a Hot Cake??

A few weeks ago I was part of an art fair in Minneola, Florida. I was doing an encaustic Hot Box demo and I was making small 4×4 abstracts. I had framed a few pieces and my intention was just to show how encaustic wax can be used as for a monotype. Well one women insisted on purchasing one in a frame and a few others. Since then people have been emailing me when I can come back or how do they purchase a piece. So I am going to be posting them on line to sell. Go know that a demo can become a piece of art. I guess the public is more creative then I am.

Distress is the look for me… for now

I finally found a look that I like. It only has taken me 2 years to find a theme to work on. I had been trying all different techniques, but I know that when I worked in acrylics I always like the negative space and would remover layers with sandpaper. I can’t sandpaper the wax, but I do like to scrap. I also have to slow down, as I get to anxious and have to remember to scrap when the wax has sat for a few hours. I would always scrap when the wax was not cool and I would scrape off everything down to the panel. I am so use to working in fashion at a frantic pace-I lived Project Runway, and I have to remember that I don’t do that anymore.
But I am really happy with this direction I am taking.